andrillian:

Some narumitsu cuddles to cheer myself up, because school is so damn stressful!!! >.<
this is actually a panel of a mini-comic I’m working on, but I liked it so much I decided to colour it.

andrillian:

Some narumitsu cuddles to cheer myself up, because school is so damn stressful!!! >.<

this is actually a panel of a mini-comic I’m working on, but I liked it so much I decided to colour it.

laurenceorange:


"… hopefully you realize, things c h a n g e depending on how you look at them. People, too. We never really know if our clients are guilty or innocent. All we can do is believe in them. And in order to believe in them, you have to believe in yourself.” - Mia Fey.

/// Special thanks to aomineplz | I coudn’t have done this without her&#160;!! &#92;

laurenceorange:

"… hopefully you realize, things c h a n g e depending on how you look at them. People, too. We never really know if our clients are guilty or innocent. All we can do is believe in them. And in order to believe in them, you have to believe in yourself.” - Mia Fey.

/// Special thanks to aomineplz | I coudn’t have done this without her !! \

Writing Lessons to Remember

fictionwritingtips:

I’ve learned a few important lessons over the years and I wanted to share them all with you. These are things that I’ve found useful and it took me a long time to come to these conclusions, so I hope they can help you out. Everyone has a different approach to writing, so take the time to figure out yours!

Take care of yourself

Sometimes whatever you’re working on takes a while to complete. You might get stuck. You might need extra time. Writing is supposed to be something you love doing, so let it unravel at its own pace. I don’t want to say “don’t stress” because everyone has something they’re dealing with. Remember why you love writing and try to always keep those feelings with you.

Stop comparing yourself to others. 

Everyone does things different and works at their own pace. If you write fast or slow, don’t let anyone tell you you’re doing it wrong. Just because a writer can finish a manuscript faster than you doesn’t mean you’re failing. Work at your own pace and be satisfied with your own progress. Let other people motivated you, but don’t let them bring you down.

Don’t let anyone tell you what you should be doing PERIOD. 

No one has all the answers and only you know what works for your own writing. There are only a few writing experts. My advice is supposed to be a guide, not a rule book. I only know how to do things the way I do it, so feel free to figure out what works best for you. Experiment with different advice and form your own rules.

Diversity is important. 

Try switching up how you normally do things and see what you can come up with because representation is so incredibly important. Don’t always go with what you feel comfortable with. Avoid stereotypes. Do your research. Step out of your comfort zone. Your writing will benefit from all these things. Also, support other writers who are writing great stories when you can.

Don’t be afraid to try something new. 

If you have an idea and you love it (no matter how crazy it seems), TRY IT OUT. You might have that one-in-a-million idea everyone else is looking for. You might come up with an idea that inspires you like nothing else has. You have to branch out and give yourself a chance.

Share your work. 

You need to share you work if you want to improve yourself. You need to share your work if you want to get published. People may criticize you, but you’re taking a brave and important step. Opening yourself up to rejection is part of being a creative person. You just have to keep yourself grounded and remind yourself you have what it takes.

-Kris Noel

nikinapalm:

anderfelon:

hey guYS
HEY GUYS LOOK
!!!!!

good

nikinapalm:

anderfelon:

hey guYS

HEY GUYS LOOK

!!!!!

good

iwilleatyourenglish:

everyone has said and done problematic things in their lifetime. that’s a result of the society we live in, not necessarily a reflection of their character.

what is a reflection of their character is how they react to being informed of the negativity within their behavior and statements, and whether or not they choose to change their behavior.

andrillian:

Some narumitsu cuddles to cheer myself up, because school is so damn stressful!!! &gt;.
this is actually a panel of a mini-comic I’m working on, but I liked it so much I decided to colour it.

andrillian:

Some narumitsu cuddles to cheer myself up, because school is so damn stressful!!! >.

this is actually a panel of a mini-comic I’m working on, but I liked it so much I decided to colour it.

medievalpoc:

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Unknown artist, possibly of the Brazilian School
Black Artist Completing a Portrait of a White Female Aristocrat
Brazil (early 1700s)
Oil on canvas
Philadelphia private collection
[x], [x]
I was thrilled at first to see this image - a pre-modern Black woman artist, portrayed at work! But then I saw this:
Although this black artist appears to be wearing a dress, it is likely to be a male figure. As the scholar Sheldon Cheek explains, the artist wears an earring and a silver collar, both common articles worn by black male servants/slaves in Europe during the 17th and 18th centuries, the collar traditionally indicating slave status. Women rarely, if ever, wore the silver collar. The artist also appears to be wearing a silver “shackle” on the arm.
Ugh. Pretty awful.

I think we should all be pretty critical of what’s written about this painting. Especially the part you’ve quoted above about how they have assigned the gender of the artist in the painting. I find it bizarre that something that is supposed to indicate enslaved status (not gender) somehow trumps this person wearing women’s clothing (that’s also a woman’s hat to the best of my knowledge).
The Americas, including Brazil, have a long tradition of transgender and third gender people. This is one of those images from the past that falls quite easily through the cracks because it is a collection of “exceptions”; it doesn’t fit nicely into categories that have been created and therefore, it’s more or less ignored.
If anyone’s hesitant to be critical, maybe you should also note that both the articles linked above make claims that slavery in Brazil was “less harsh” than other places. What???
How many of our assumptions are being projected onto this painting? Are the “contradictions” present in it a product of the painting itself, or is the problem with the categories we try to place it in? How many layers do we have to fight uphill through when we even look at this image? After all, History teaches us:
women weren’t artists
Black people weren’t artists
Black people were enslaved
Enslaved people didn’t do anything of worth
Transgender, genderqueer and third gender people didn’t exist before the 1960s
white people control how Black images are perceived, but not the other way around
gender must be immediately perceivable and fit into our categories of “male” and “female”
^ So this is the baggage we bring with us when we look at this image. We look at this painting, and we actively search for indicators that allow us to continue to believe the above assumptions.
If we take away those assumptions, if we try to move past them and see this portrait with new eyes, what are we left with? Whose History do we see here? Maybe it’s mine; maybe it’s yours.

medievalpoc:

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Unknown artist, possibly of the Brazilian School

Black Artist Completing a Portrait of a White Female Aristocrat

Brazil (early 1700s)

Oil on canvas

Philadelphia private collection

[x], [x]

I was thrilled at first to see this image - a pre-modern Black woman artist, portrayed at work! But then I saw this:

Although this black artist appears to be wearing a dress, it is likely to be a male figure. As the scholar Sheldon Cheek explains, the artist wears an earring and a silver collar, both common articles worn by black male servants/slaves in Europe during the 17th and 18th centuries, the collar traditionally indicating slave status. Women rarely, if ever, wore the silver collar. The artist also appears to be wearing a silver “shackle” on the arm.

Ugh. Pretty awful.

I think we should all be pretty critical of what’s written about this painting. Especially the part you’ve quoted above about how they have assigned the gender of the artist in the painting. I find it bizarre that something that is supposed to indicate enslaved status (not gender) somehow trumps this person wearing women’s clothing (that’s also a woman’s hat to the best of my knowledge).

The Americas, including Brazil, have a long tradition of transgender and third gender people. This is one of those images from the past that falls quite easily through the cracks because it is a collection of “exceptions”; it doesn’t fit nicely into categories that have been created and therefore, it’s more or less ignored.

If anyone’s hesitant to be critical, maybe you should also note that both the articles linked above make claims that slavery in Brazil was “less harsh” than other places. What???

How many of our assumptions are being projected onto this painting? Are the “contradictions” present in it a product of the painting itself, or is the problem with the categories we try to place it in? How many layers do we have to fight uphill through when we even look at this image? After all, History teaches us:

  • women weren’t artists
  • Black people weren’t artists
  • Black people were enslaved
  • Enslaved people didn’t do anything of worth
  • Transgender, genderqueer and third gender people didn’t exist before the 1960s
  • white people control how Black images are perceived, but not the other way around
  • gender must be immediately perceivable and fit into our categories of “male” and “female”

^ So this is the baggage we bring with us when we look at this image. We look at this painting, and we actively search for indicators that allow us to continue to believe the above assumptions.

If we take away those assumptions, if we try to move past them and see this portrait with new eyes, what are we left with? Whose History do we see here? Maybe it’s mine; maybe it’s yours.

christel-thoughts:

Perfect
ask me my “top 5” anything!

cheapfilling:

college is catered towards the able bodied and able minded. school applauds people who can stay up all night, skip meals, and work endlessly. that kind of extreme contribution is expected. why are disabled people being squeezed out of academic institutions? why should I feel inferior because of some arbitrary and ridiculous standard?

A twee niceness is snark’s mirror image, more pleasant, but as a guiding principle, almost as vacant. Niceness is an affect, a surface level tendency. A lot of the gamblers on Wall Street who wrecked a generation’s economy are really nice bros. Some of the soldiers shelling schools in Gaza are probably teddy bears around their families. The twee boys running our college newspapers might be really polite as they discount women’s opinions. Niceness doesn’t necessarily speak to any deeper commitment to justice. In fact, it can be used to gloss over it.
fairymascot:

adventuresofcomicbookgirl:

I’m glad Miles shares my opinion of Franziska

SEE IF ONLY HE HAD ACTUALLY LET HER KNOW HOW HIGHLY HE THINKS OF HER AS SHE WAS GROWING UP SHE MIGHT’VE BEEN A SLIGHTLY LESS MESSED UP INDIVIDUAL WITH NO SENSE OF SELF WORTH TODAY!!!
like gosh it’s just painful how much they’ve always respected and cared for each other but were too emotionally stilted and and distant to let each other know. STUPID SIBLINGS you make me so sad

fairymascot:

adventuresofcomicbookgirl:

I’m glad Miles shares my opinion of Franziska

SEE IF ONLY HE HAD ACTUALLY LET HER KNOW HOW HIGHLY HE THINKS OF HER AS SHE WAS GROWING UP SHE MIGHT’VE BEEN A SLIGHTLY LESS MESSED UP INDIVIDUAL WITH NO SENSE OF SELF WORTH TODAY!!!

like gosh it’s just painful how much they’ve always respected and cared for each other but were too emotionally stilted and and distant to let each other know. STUPID SIBLINGS you make me so sad

6 plays

L’Arc~en~Ciel -  Winter Fall

kelgrid:

“Cole will always wear *that hat*. No matter what head gear you give him.”

kelgrid:

“Cole will always wear *that hat*. No matter what head gear you give him.”